Book Wordy podcast 7 The Queen’s Favorite transcript

Transcript for the Book Wordy podcast 7 The Queen’s Favorite.

Byrd Nash
Welcome to Book Wordy, a podcast about fantasy and science fiction books, authors, and the art of writing. I’m your host, Byrd Nash, former journalist and author of the Wicked Wolves of Windsor and other fairytales.

Miles
Welcome to Book Wordy. This is Miles.

Byrd Nash
And Byrd Nash and we’re here again to talk about some of the short stories in the Wicked Wolves of Windsor and other fairytales. I’m going to be doing a series of podcasts that each feature one of the short stories in the Wicked Wolves book. Some of them will have spoilers, this one will not. That I’ll discuss how it relates to fairy tales, but also other themes and fantasy literature. So if you’re not familiar with the stories, that’s okay, join us. Listen in. You’re going to find some other things that I’ll have in here about how stories operate, how to write stories, but also what are common themes in fairy tales and in fantasy. What makes books our favorite. Why we continue reading certain stories and we really connect with them and why we don’t. I’d like to start off this podcast with the beginning of the Queen’s Favorite.

The Queen’s favorite was a pretty black mare with large soulful eyes, a dish nose, and a muzzle that could fit into the palm of a child’s hand. She arrived with the wedding gifts and was a consummate liar.

The Queen’s favorite has several themes that are very particular to fairy tales. But let’s talk first about which fairy tale kind of inspired this story.

Miles
I think one of the major influences was the Italian Fairy Tales collection of Italo Calvino classic Italian story called The Enchanted Filly about…

Byrd Nash
An enchanted horse, but don’t read that fairy tale before you read this story.

Miles
Right.

Byrd Nash
Because it might give, be a plot spoiler! So read, if you want to read it later, it’ll be in the show notes with some information. But the Enchanted Filly is part of the inspiration for this story. It won’t be one as familiar with many readers. That’s one reason why I like to use it, because then when, you wouldn’t know it like Cinderella or Beauty and the Beast and I could have more fun with it. I can play around with it.

Miles
But as in this story, the protagonist is a young woman, the enchanted filly is her companion who gives her advice.

Byrd Nash
I don’t think in the Queen’s Favorite the, Malika gives her much advice. Speaking of which, no one has said this probably because they haven’t gone and researched it. But Malika means queen. And I think it’s Arabic. I know I have it in my notes at home. But that’s what it translates to. So when you read the story of the Queen’s Favorite, knowing that the horse is also named a queen, or is seen as being a queen, you’ll see the duality between Malika the horse and the Queen,the woman. Or the position of Elaine as the queen, and how that changes as the story evolves.

It is one of the longest story, one of the longer stories in the Wicked Wolves book, and because it was one of the longer ones it gave me more room to build the character of Elaine. And maybe that’s one reason it’s one of the favorites in the story. I heard back from beta readers and also from reviewers, and they all love the Queen’s Favorite. It’s definitely one of the favorite stories in the collection. And some of that kind of baffles me. Miles will, can tell you more about why it baffles me. Go for it Miles.

Miles
I’m not sure why it baffles you. I can tell you things that I like about the story.

Byrd Nash
Okay, no spoilers.

Miles
No spoilers. This is definitely a story of a woman moving from powerlessness to power. It happens over a long period of time. It isn’t just the heroine suddenly decides to do something. This follows her progress over period of time.

Byrd Nash
It does and I mean, I saw this as over the place of six months even maybe a year. I kind of tried to play with that a little bit with the seasons being mentioned. It’s definitely not, like you said, that she wakes up one morning goes oh, I’m powerful. I have power. Now I have my magic sorceress gift, I’m going to kill everybody in the kingdom. That’s not what happens. So…

Miles
I think one of the things that appeals about the character of Elaine and her story is that it is a story that the reader can project themselves into very naturally. Elaine is a very real, natural and believable person with realistic reactions. She is not apparently magical herself. She has no magical powers.

Byrd Nash
Well, Elaine is also a caring, kind person who’s put into a position through her marriage of having no power. Maybe that’s another thing that people can identify with. I don’t know. I mean, sometimes you think no one’s listening to you. No one’s seeing you. And I did want to read it another passage from the book that talks about that, because that goes into the character of Elaine and kind of the action of what’s happening here.

The Queen sat down on the throne, pulling the long heavy train of her gown off to the side. She had learned to keep a placid expression on her face revealing nothing of how she felt. If she said or did anything, it would earn her his ire. On the other hand, if she did not speak when he demanded it, it also infuriated him.

Knowing this, Elaine found it easy to remove her mind to another place, all well appearing to listen. She nodded when required. Once asked by Everard for her opinion, she deferred to his own with an insipid speech about the male superiority in such things.

When we first meet Queen Elaine, she is still with her husband, the king. In a court where she is seen as a non entity. No one wants her opinion, no one listens to her opinion. If she expressed an opinion, she probably would be punished. It is not a situation that is conducive to someone spouting off their mouth, or saying their side of the story, or getting into other people’s business. She survives by removing herself mentally and emotionally from all the events that’s happening around her. And that goes to the theme of powerlessness that we talked about in another podcast, that we have a character that starts out without any power. By the end of the story, she is supreme in her power. This is why I think the story becomes a favorite for people. All the power springs from herself and who she is. It doesn’t spring from a magical power, doesn’t spring from waving a magic wand. It springs from she has learned who she is and her own abilities, thus becomes victorious at the end.

Miles
She assumes her power, accepts her power, becomes powerful. Not through anybody else’s actions. She isn’t saved by anybody, and she doesn’t use any actually magical means to do so. At the end, all she needed was the courage and freedom to be herself.

Byrd Nash
I know. And I love that ending. I can’t tell you, readers, what the ending is. You have to go get the book. But I just love the ending. It’s one of my favorite. Even though the story is probably not one of my favorites, the ending of the story is my favorite ending of all the stories in Wicked Wolves. It leaves you with such satisfaction. I don’t know, just satisfying.

Miles
it really does. And I think part of it is that at the beginning, you can quite understand why Elaine doesn’t speak and why she efaces herself and doesn’t speak her mind or use her power. Doesn’t even know she has power.

Byrd Nash
Yeah, she doesn’t even know she has power.

Miles
But through the story, you see that she does have power. And she always had power. Through herself. Her own personality and her brains, her wisdom, and her strength of character. And by the end, she has this power and she uses it and shows it.

Byrd Nash
The thing is that she has always had the power. At the end she acknowledges and she accepts that she has the power. This is part of why I call this a healing story when I describe it, is that this is a woman who thinks she’s powerless. She’s never been powerless. This is a woman who thinks that she was a nothing. She’s never been a nothing. This is a woman who never knew what was valuable about herself. But when she realizes what’s valuable about herself, she is, like I said, victorious. And the end… To me, that was why I love this story, is really the ending I find super powerful. Now I just think people like the story because there’s a horse in it. And there’s a dog. I mean, I don’t know, there’s a horse and there’s a dog and maybe that’s why everyone loves the story because everyone mentions the horse. So I’m assuming that’s why.

Miles
Those are always powerful. Everyone loves the horse and…

Byrd Nash
Well if you’re a girl you love em, if you’re a woman or girl you’ve always loved horses

Miles
I’m not a horse lover. I liked the character of the horse because it is a reflection of her character. Malika is a inverted mirror, or is actually a not inverted mirror, of Elaine’s own self and how she presents herself.

Byrd Nash
Exactly. So I think that readers probably get that once they finish the story. But I do want to talk about that as a plot device. When you are writing stories, it is helpful to have another character in the story that’s either a mirror or a reverse mirror of the protagonist. So in this case, Elaine is our protagonist and she has several mirrors in the story The Queen’s Favorite. One of the mirrors is her husband, King Everard, who is actually the anti-mirror. She, he is the reverse mirror of what Elaine really is. Elaine is passive, he’s aggressive, He is corrupt, she’s non-corruptable. She’s honest, he’s corrupt. He’s vicious, she’s kind. They call this, when you develop characters like this, they’re called your foils, and Shakespere did this a lot in his stories. He always had a character that had another character that would be the foil of the first character. We always know there’s protagonist and there’s an antagonist. But what you may not realize is that, how are the protagonist and the antagonist the same? How are they different? In the situation with Elaine and Everard, the king and the queen, the king has power due to his position. The Queen should have power due to her position, but she does not. The king makes judgments. So does the Queen, she also makes judgments in the story. These are the parallels that when you’re developing your story, think about your characters. Just don’t throw them out there, like Oh, he’s going to have a best friend. Oh, he’s going to have, he’s going to have an enemy, and Oh, he’s going to have a mom and Oh, he’s going to have a dad. He’s going to have a cousin. He’s going to have a son. What are these characters relationships to their other character. This is where king and queen, they’re a mirror of each other. One’s a dark mirror. One is one of hope and one is one of destruction. And then the way that the story unfolds Malika, who’s probably the more obvious foil, Molika is almost the physical representation… Well she is. That’s from me, the author. I can tell you this. She, Malika, the horse is the physical representation of Queen Elaine’s inner self.

Miles
A physical representation of how Queen Elaine is projecting herself outwards. When Queen Elaine is muting herself, and hiding herself, and presenting a false front to the world because she thinks she has to, then Malika is lying. Everything she says is a lie. Because everything Queen Elaine is saying, physically and non physically, is a lie.

Byrd Nash
Exactly. That was the plan of the role of what Malika the horse has to Queen Elaine as a person. When we’re building stories, and we’re building characters, we need to not just bring in people that walk on stage and then walk off stage. If you have a character, that they need a drink of water and it’s because you want to show how nervous they are. And the waiter comes up to give them a drink of water. We don’t have to spend a lot of time on the waiter. The waiter doesn’t even need a name. The waiter comes up, hands the water, and exit stage right. If the character is getting a drink of water while they’re facing off their enemy, how is the enemy like them? And how is the enemy opposite of them? Protagonist is drinking water because they’re so nervous, versus the antagonist is drinking wine and they’re very relaxed. You’ve got to play with these things as a way to visually show the reader. How are these two people alike? And how are these two people different? And then that shows them also the hero’s journey through the story because as the hero journeys through the story, and faces their challenges and overcome their challenges. They antagonist doesn’t overcome their challenges. Doesn’t grow. So because they didn’t grow, they actually fail in the end. When the protagonist who’s gained their power. or taken back their power, or has understood their true nature, they succeed against the antagonist. The antagonist fails because the antagonist is not self aware. And you see that with the king character. He’s not self aware. He’s an arrogant, unpleasant monster of a person who never changes. He’s a monster in the beginning and he’s a monster at the end. And because Elaine changes she’s able to be victorious.

Miles
Even from the beginning King Everard is the oil of Queen Elaine in a different way, Because king Everard knows he has power. And he uses it and flaunts it in a completely selfish way. He shows bad side of power. Of how power is abused and how power corrupts. How owning your power can turn you into a horrible, horrible person.

Byrd Nash
Yeah, he’s actually a poster boy for absolute power corrupts absolutely. I mean, he’s kind of gone off the deep end. And he, especially near the end, he’s gone completely off the deep end. And he’s not benefiting anybody by remaining king. And that’s definitely not true. One of the interesting things, I don’t want to give it away, but at one point Queen Elaine even forgets that she has her crown. Because she has disavowed her own power, her own ability to make change. Her own ability to be her own ruler. So she’s forgotten that she even has a crown.

And at the end when she takes her crown back, I mean, that should be… That actually happened, that scene at the very end about her wearing her crown again actually happened because of the beta reader not really understanding what would happen after this story ended. And they were upset because they weren’t quite sure what would happen after the story ended. And not to give away the ending. I don’t want to do that, I don’t want to spoiler here, but Queen Elaine taking her crown back I actually wrote into that story, after the beta readers read the story, because I wanted it quite clear. Maybe you were the one that said that, you didn’t know, I don’t remember if you were the one.

Miles
Some of your beta readers said it but I concurred that it was unclear.

Byrd Nash
To me it was clear as, it was clear as day. So this again, not to beat you authors on the top of your head. But this is why you have beta readers. Because what seems very clear to us, in terms of what our characters are doing, or why they did that, or how the story ended. Because we’re living in our own little world that, of course, we have all the backstory, and all the characters. And we know who those characters mothers were and what their names were, we never put it in the story. This is all in our head. And when beta readers read the story, they don’t get it. This is your opportunity to help them clarify and make your story better. Because most people reading your story will be utter stranger. If you’re story takes off, which I really hope Wicked Wolves does. But if your story takes off, you’re going to have hopefully thousands of people who are dead strangers to you. You don’t know their background, you don’t know their reading ability. Don’t know what other books they’ve read. You don’t know anything about them. Read your story, and if they don’t understand your message, your vision, then you haven’t clarified your vision.

Going back to the Queen Elaine and the Queen’s Favorite from Wicked Wolves. That ending was clear as day to me what happened. And, but I got several beta readers who they loved the story but they were like, But what happened next? I’m like, well, didn’t you see what happened next? Don’t you get the concept? And I got my, I was like, hmm! If that doesn’t happen, you have to go back and you have to… It doesn’t mean you have to rip your story apart and remove lots of bits. What I’ve found through my own writing is it means two things have to happen. One, you’re muddling things up by putting into many details. And they’re not the right details. So you’re padding the story and putting in extra stuff about Oh, Queen, Queen Elaine, went and brushed her teeth, and Queen Elaine put her shoes on, and Queen Elaine had a stain on her dress, she had to get it out with baking soda. That you were going into too much fluff stuff so you can pad your word count. And we’re not getting to the meat of the story.

So first go through, remove the fluff. If you’re, if you’re beta readers or your readers are not getting it getting your vision, your padding it. Remove the fluff. That in turn, when you remove the fluff, it’s just like when you lose weight. When you lose weight, you see more of the skeleton, your cheekbones become more prominent. When you lose the fat off your story, suddenly, the skeleton of your story will become more prominent. The things that you feel are important will become more easily seen. Then you go back in your next draft, after you cut the fat out, and you add in. And it can only… You know what was surprising when I went back and did edits on these stories is, just one sentence suddenly clarified, brought everything into focus. Like, so if you look through a camera and you’re trying to focus. It just takes a little bit of the change of the dial, suddenly you’re terribly in focus.

If you’re having problems with your readers not understanding what you’re writing, or not seeing your vision, One, cut back some of the fluff. Cut back a lot of your word verbiage or what I call the diarrhea. Your vomit, you know, we don’t need all your word vomit on the page. Go back, trim out that. Watch your skeleton of your story reemerge, then you return to the story and then you start tweaking it sentence by, putting in little sentences. And I’m going to ask you because you’ve seen stuff of mine very much in the rough draft, and then three or four times later, as a reader give your viewpoint of what I just said.

Miles
That’s definitely what I’ve seen from going from rough drafts to the finished version. Often the very first versions have a lot, a lot of backstory, a lot of atmospheric setup, that is interesting, but it slows the story down and muddies it. In early drafts that gets trimmed out. And until there’s just the essential plot and it is crisp and clear. And it’s much more powerful. But often there’s something that, I’m not quite sure what you meant here. or that something can be misunderstood or something is unclear. And then it seems like very small tweaks: adding a word, breaking a sentence, breaking a compound sentence into two or rearranging, swapping the order of a paragraph. And suddenly everything starts to become clear. And it’s amazing how small a change can bring amazing clarity.

Byrd Nash
So from a writing standpoint, what you have to do is, you do have to do a lot of word vomit in the beginning. Vomit a lot of words. Put a lot of words on your computer, on your keyboard, on your typewriter, whatever you’re using to write. You have to do that because you have to get a sheer number of words on the page in order to build a story. You can’t build a story with “Jack ran up the hill. Jack ran down the hill.” No one wants to read that kind of story. You have to write “Jack ran up the hill. He was wearing a hat. He had a dog with him. Jill was racing after him. Jill was pissed off at Jack.” We have to put a lot of word vomit together. Beginner writers get kind of discouraged by that because they’re like, Oh, this isn’t any good. This is such garbage. Well, you have to start with garbage. You have to start with more than you’re ever going to use.

Where I see the problem with, and I’m definitely seeing that problem with indie authors who don’t have an editor helping them, is then they leave it at that stage. And they think, oh, wow, I just wrote 80,000 words, and this is great stuff. And then I’m going to publish it. Please don’t do that, you need to take a hard look at what you just did. You have to take a hard look at all the word vomit that you did. And then you have to decide some stuff about it.

Like for example, we’ve already talked about Milking Time. But that’s a prime example of where I did some word vomit that got removed. And that was all about the character Bess and all her family, and her relationship with her father, and why they end up on the farm. I had so, I had probably a page, I think I actually ended up with two pages of back history that I removed from that story. It slowed the action down like what Miles said. It just slowed the pace the story down. And when you go into all this back history, and you put all your word vomit together and you haven’t removed it or cleaned it up, this is where you’ll start losing your readers and they’ll put your book aside. And they’ll get bored with your story, or they’ll get confused. The kindest ones will just get confused.

When we went to Queen Elaine, I don’t remember Queen Elaine having a lot of editing. But I do remember that ending. The ending of Queen’s Favorite iss supposed to go out with a huge bang, like an explosive bang. I wanted it to be really powerful. This is where reading, having beta readers, and having Miles read through it, and go “I’m confused.” I wanted that story to be crystal clear at the ending because you can’t have banb endings… Okay, you had the big bang. Big bang happened at your end. And now you go through four pages of epilogue to explain what the big bang was. That doesn’t work. I mean, I’ve read some books with really great epilogues I love reading. Usually they’re epilogues like four years later, this is what happened. And I love reading that kind of stuff. But with this kind of story and how I wanted it to end, I wanted it to end with my reader closing my book after they read that story and go “Damn, that was good. I’m satisfied.” Th at’s the kind of ending I wanted that story to go with. So every phrase, every sentence had to be chosen with a lot of care.

Miles
And I definitely saw that through the progress of the drafts, seeing the beta readers discussions. The very first version of the end was really powerful, and dramatic and really amazing. But it left a lot of questions. To me, it left some emotional lines hanging. Like, wow, that was amazing. But what did it mean, what what was the impact?

Byrd Nash
Well, I think a lot of questions is what happened to Elaine afterwards. But where was Elaine after this?

Miles
And I know that when Byrd got response back from beta readers saying, I don’t know what’s going on? Can you explain it? I was like, I see what they mean. This needs clarification. I need to know a little bit more. But don’t tell me too much. Because if you put two pages of epilogue explaining what happened, it’ll dilute the whole story and it’ll ruin it all. But you, there’s a balance. You can’t explain nothing, but you can’t explain everything.

Byrd Nash
Like you said, there’s a balance. I honestly, I think most of my readers wanted me to put two pages of explanation. And I just dug my heels in. And this is where you have to take criticism, process it realistically with your vision, and decide what you’re going to do. So when I got it back from beta readers, and they were like, well, I want to know what happened to Queen Elaine later. What happened to her? I knew my vision was not going to explain what happened to her for the next 20 years of her life. I wasn’t going to do that. I wanted that big bang ending. But I also knew that I could see where they were coming from.

They wanted clarification of what her future was going to be. They didn’t need to know, from my vision, that Oh, she had four kids and she was happy. And she had lots of money. And she wore expensive clothes. And she never had another worry in her whole entire life. And they didn’t need to know all that, which that really actually isn’t her future. So don’t expect that. But they needed to know some comfort, some explanation, some clarification of what her future was going to be. What was going to happen to her when they left Elaine. They had to have some sort of satisfaction.

Where, if they had had control of the story, they probably would have wanted me to write the four or five, ten pages of epilogue. But I as an author and knowing my vision and knowing what I could do, I knew that I could explain it by just… I think I ended up adding maybe only about… I edited two paragraphs, that’s at the very, very end. And then I changed it where she had her crown. And that alone took care of all the problems that the beta readers wanted.

So when you have someone offering critiques on your book, which thank you very much beta readers, and we appreciate all the volunteer work that you do with no recognition and well, very little recognition and no money. There is no money in beta reading, you only have the acclaim of the people forever. And that’s from Iron Chef. So if you don’t know what that means, go watch Iron Chef. So you have the acclaim of the people forever. The author has a vision and you need to stay true to that vision.

But you definitely have to be willing to listen to critiques and feedback and take it very seriously when readers do not understand, or when readers get confused, or when readers they tell you well, I kind of fell out of the action. That’s a big danger sign. They fell out of the action, they put your book aside because they didn’t get it, or they didn’t understand, or they were confused, or it was too much information or too much action. You need to take that very, very seriously because that means they’ll put your book aside and they’ll probably never pick it back up. You don’t want that. I like the ending of Queen’s Favorite. I think everyone now is very satisfied with it. It does get the most comments from people both on my reviews on my social media, and in emails to me that they just love it. They just love that story. So a secret about that story, as I when I was writing it I really didn’t like that story. Miles and I had so many discussions about that.

Miles
I know because I was liking where the story was going as I read snippets and we talked about it, and I thought this is going to be a really good st ory. I’m loving this character and we’re just going… Byrd kept saying like, this is boring. I don’t know where this is going. I don’t really care about it. Why am I even writing this. This is a piece of trash.

Byrd Nash
I probably said a piece of trash a lot. My thing with some stories is when I’m writing, and I don’t have a clear sense of where they’re going, but I’m still kind of muddling around with them. I can get like, this is garbage. I think with the Queen’s Favorite, because I really do love horses a lot, I thought maybe it was a little too horse heavy. Maybe a little too much of the horse. I don’t know. I, maybe that was why I thought that way.

I think also it’s a very traditional story. One, the background is a medieval land. Some people have assumed that it’s England. I don’t, I don’t really see it that way. I thought it was more European, some sort of European like land. It’s a fairy tale, so I don’t have to clarify what country it’s in. It’s just a medieval setting, so… Many fairy tales take place within a quasi-medieval setting, because there’s castles mentioned. There’s kings and queens mentioned. There’s horses mentioned. People are riding horses, we’re in carriages. They’re going to these huge ball gowns, and the king makes an announcement. So we’re in some sort of medieval-like setting for Queen’s Favorite.

That’s going to bring up a subject I’m going to cover in a later podcast about how do you build a fantasy world, or a fantasy story within a setting that may be historical. How much do you need from history and how much do you not want in history? The Wicked Wolves which we discussed in the other podcast is obviously set in World War One, post World War One England, so very specific time period that I wanted to have a feeling for, versus this is medieval so I could play with it a little bit more. Is it historically accurate? Not really. Would a queen be able to roam around the countryside with her horse and not be attacked and robbed of her jewelry? Probably not. So like many fairy tales, you have to take it with a grain of salt that this can exist, even though it’s not historically accurate. It would never happen. But it maybe it could happen because being Queen Elaine seems like a real person.

Miles
And that’s one of the things that I liked about this story, is that this is definitely set in that vague fairy tale land. If you read the original fairy tales, they seem to take place in some vague unspecified land, roughly medieval, but isn’t any place in particular or really any time in particular.

Byrd Nash
Exactly. I did not want…

Miles
That’s, I love the feel of that. I knew where I was because it was nowhere.

Byrd Nash
The thing about Queen’s Favorite, and maybe another reason why I doubted myself about this story was because I was writing from a historical viewpoint that I like. I liked reading, back in the day, I don’t read it as much anymore, although I’m gonna try to get back to it. I really liked reading historical romances. I hate to use that word because historical romances now have become just romances. They’re not, they have very little history in them or they’re very inaccurate as to history. I personally really love historical books that have romance in them, but they’re historical books first. I’ll mention some in the show notes. But for example, one series I adore, which Miles has not read and will never read, is by Dorothy Dunnett. And the Lymond, the Lymond Chronicles. I adore that book because, one, it takes place during one of my favorite historical time periods and it very much uses the time. Poetry of the time, the scenery of the time, the characters that would have existed at the time. I just adore that series, that series. But it is not historical romance where there’s, the cover is a woman with her breast popping out of her dress. That’s not the kind of historical romance that I like to read.

The problem that I have is the medieval time period, when you deal with it from historical standpoint, some things that you have to work around is, one, women were married off very young. Queen Elaine was pretty young, I can’t remember accurately I think I have at age 14 marrying Everard. And that’s just a fact of the matter. She might have been married off at age 10. Not literally, but definitelyat 14 she’s going to be an old woman, and she would have been shuffled off to somebody, usually for money. The other thing about the history of that time period is, and it plays a big huge part in the third judgment that Queen Elaine gives, but flour is such a huge staple of food. So when you read the story, and you get that part, all that is historically accurate in terms of the flour, and what kind of flour they would have used, and who would have used it, and how much it would have cost, or how that all worked.

Miles
Right. And the different types of bread and things like that, which to me it wasn’t too much. It gave a really nice flavor of…

Byrd Nash
I see what you did there. You’re so clever.

I just love history part of it, but then I have to be flexible about it. What isn’t accurate to the time period is that Queen Elaine is wandering around the countryside in a very rich dress and not being robbed or raped. You know, this is a fairy tale. So you guys will have to give me a break on that. I just I love that story how it came out and I just wasn’t gonna have her be… I wasn’t gonna have that much realism in the fairy tale story of the Queen’s Favorite. So…

Miles
I think it has enough realism to be plausible. She fairly quickly gets herself into position of being under the protection of a prosperous person. Under the wing.

Byrd Nash
And when he says under the protection, he doesn’t mean in a sexual way. That’s another, you know, I don’t want anyone thinking about that. But as a patron, he becomes her her patron guide, so to help her out. Yeah, there’s a lot of history in the Queen’s Favorite, which I really enjoyed, coming from someone who likes to read that kind of stuff. But it also it is a fairy tale. So we have to take some license with it. So that wraps up the Queen’s Favorite. You can find it in the Wicked Wolves of Windsor and other fairytales, which is right now on Amazon. I’m going to be doing more podcast about the individual stories in the Wicked Wolves of Windsor. But I’m also going to be interviewing some authors in some upcoming podcasts, so stick with me and we’ll continue discussing fantasy books, fairy tales, and the art of writing.

You can find me at ByrdNash.com, Byrd spelled with a BYRD. On my website you can read the show notes to today’s podcast, as well as find a list of all the episodes. I also do book reviews and have resources for authors on the website. Frost Waltz is the music and it’s by Kevin MacLeod at incompitech.com.

Transcribed by Otter.ai
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